Last edited by Mibar
Tuesday, October 13, 2020 | History

1 edition of Brassica crops and wild allies found in the catalog.

Brassica crops and wild allies

Brassica crops and wild allies

biology and breeding

  • 211 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Japan Scientific Societies Press, exclusive distributor ISBS in Tokyo, Forest Grove, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Brassica.,
  • Brassica -- Breeding.,
  • Cruciferae.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies.

    Statementedited by S. Tsunoda, K. Hinata and C. Gómez-Campo.
    ContributionsTsunoda, Shigesaburō, 1919-, Hinata, K. 1934-, Gómez-Campo, C.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSB317.B65 B72
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 354 p. :
    Number of Pages354
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4243571M
    LC Control Number80670243

    Rapid-cycling populations of six economically important species in the genus Brassica have unusual potential for resolving many problems in plant biology and for use in education. Rapid-cycling brassicas can produce up to ten generations of seed per year and serve as models for research in genetics, host-parasite relations, molecular biology, cell biology, plant biochemistry, population.   Fertiliser for brassicas. Brassicas have a high requirement for nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P).An adequate supply of these nutrients is critical to maximise the yield potential of the crop. According to the Teagasc Green Book, at soil Index 3, kale and Redstart will require: kg of N/ha (split dressing); 30kg of P/ha; and kg of K/ha.. It is advisable to fertilise a crop of Redstart.

    is a platform for academics to share research papers.   Seed glucosinolates have been determined for 14 wild Brassica species, by micro-scale GC analysis of silylated derivatives. Of these, 12 were investigated for the first time. The majority of taxa exhibited high alkenylglucosinolate levels, although prop-2 .

    As a member of the tribe Brassiceae, Eruca sativa, although a minor crop worldwide, is considered a valuable genetic resource for cabbage, rapeseed and other Brassica crops. Self-incompatibility (SI) in Brassica has been extensively studied, but information on SI in E. sativa is limited. Of six chemicals used to treat the stigmas to overcome SI in five E. sativa lines, gibberellin was the most. Brassica crops and wild allies, Biology and breeding. Tokyo: Scientific Societies Press; pp. 89– Momotaz A, Kato M, Kakihara F. Production of intergeneric hybrids between Brassica and Sinapis species by means of embryo rescue techniques. Euphytica. ; – doi: /A


Share this book
You might also like
Brontës

Brontës

Edward Lears Book of Nonsense and More No

Edward Lears Book of Nonsense and More No

Structural geology of the Aulneau Peninsula, Lake of the Woods, Ontario

Structural geology of the Aulneau Peninsula, Lake of the Woods, Ontario

dreamer not the dream

dreamer not the dream

Facts acknowledged!

Facts acknowledged!

Correcting the boundary of Crater Lake National Park in the state of Oregon, and for other purposes

Correcting the boundary of Crater Lake National Park in the state of Oregon, and for other purposes

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Vegetables and Fruit in Asia (World Trade Report)

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Vegetables and Fruit in Asia (World Trade Report)

Federal-state relations in water law

Federal-state relations in water law

Our female ancestors

Our female ancestors

Letter from the Postmaster General, addressed to the Committee of Ways and Means, relative to the estimates for the service of the Post Office Department during the year ending June 30, 1860.

Letter from the Postmaster General, addressed to the Committee of Ways and Means, relative to the estimates for the service of the Post Office Department during the year ending June 30, 1860.

Geological notes on St. Helena

Geological notes on St. Helena

Household words

Household words

The rise and fall of the healthy factory

The rise and fall of the healthy factory

Intellectual property in Australia

Intellectual property in Australia

Dynamical systems in the plane

Dynamical systems in the plane

Achieving peak performance

Achieving peak performance

H.J. HEINZ COMPANY

H.J. HEINZ COMPANY

Rock-paintings in Africa.

Rock-paintings in Africa.

Brassica crops and wild allies Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract: This monograph on Brassica brassica Subject Category: Organism Names see more details crops and wild spp. is divided into sections on systematics (5 chapters), domestication (4 chapters), breeding (7 chapters) and conservation (3 chapters).

The following are noted. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Brassica crops and wild allies. Tokyo: Japan Scientific Societies Press ; Forest Grove, Or.: exclusive distributor ISBS, Brassica crop species and their allies (Raphanus, Sinapis, Eruca, etc.) are important sources of edible roots, stems, leaves, buds and inflorescences, as well as of edible or industrial oils, condiments and forage.

Many well known names of plants or plant products, such as kale, cabbage, brocolli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kohl-rabi, Chinese cabbage, turnip, rape, rutabaga, swede, colza Price: $ Brassica and Its Close Allies: Cytogenetics and Domestication of Brassica Crops, Plant Breeding Reviews, /, (19 Zai-Yun Li, Intra- and intergenomic relationships in interspecific hybrids between Brassica (B.

rapa, B. napus) and a wild species B. maurorum as revealed by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), Euphytica Cited by: Book chapter: Brassica crops and wild allies. [I]. pp ref Abstract: This area is reviewed under the following headings: (1) ecophysiology of cultivated Brassica brassica Subject Category: Organism Names see more details species, (2 Cited by: Snogerup S () The wild forms of the Brassica oleracea group (2n = 18) and their possible relations to the cultivated ones.

In: Tsunoda S, Hinata K, Gomez-Campo C (eds) Brassica crops and wild allies, biology and breeding. Japan Scientific Societies Press, Tokyo, pp – Google Scholar. The genus represents a wide range of crops including oilseed, many vegetables and fodder crops and wild species.

In some species this whole range of uses is present. The wide range of crops, species and applications cause Brassica genetic resources to be even more scattered over collections than other crops; no single collection holds the.

For Brassica crops, since a sterility inducing cytoplasm identified in a wild population of Raphanus sativus (Ogura CMS) was introduced into B. napus and B. oleracea (Bannerot et al., ), a.

Yi Ming Guo, Birgit Samans, Sheng Chen, Kidist B. Kibret, Sarah Hatzig, Neil C. Turner, Matthew N. Nelson, Wallace A. Cowling, Rod J. Snowdon, Drought-Tolerant Brassica rapa Shows Rapid Expression of Gene Networks for General Stress Responses and Programmed Cell Death Under Simulated Drought Stress, Plant Molecular Biology Reporter, Our joint forage brassica programme combines our expertise with Plant & Food Research.

The result is a range of class-leading brassicas. PGG Wrightson Seeds are committed to providing brassica forage crops that not only produce high quantities of feed, but also lead to improved animal performance through feed quality, thereby providing positive benefits to the New Zealand farmer.

Crop Genetic Biodiversity with Special Reference to Oilseed Brassicas and Wild Allies: Conservation and Their Utilization Chapter January with 15 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Brassica crop species and their allies (Raphanus, Sinapis, Eruca, etc.) are important sources of edible roots, stems, leaves, buds and inflorescences, as well as of edible or industrial oils, condiments and forage.

Many well known names of plants or plant products, such as kale, cabbage, brocolli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kohl-rabi, Chinese cabbage, turnip, rape, rutabaga, swede, colza. Major differences were found in the occurrence of glucosinolates in the leaves of different wild species of the Brassica oleracea (2n = 18) group.

The distribution of glucosinolates supports the present classification with the exception of the inclusion of both Tunisian and Sardinian populations within B. results also support the hypothesis of a multiphyletic origin of cultivated.

Brassica crop species and their allies (Raphanus, Sinapis, Eruca, etc.) are important sources of edible roots, stems, leaves, buds and inflorescences, as well as of.

Brassica is the type genus of the mustard family, members of the genus may be collectively known either as cabbages, or as mustards.

This genus is remarkable for containing more important agricultural and horticultural crops than any other genus. Nishi, S () Differentiation of Brassica crops in Asia and the breeding of ‘Hakuran’ a newly synthesized leafy vegetable.

In: Tsunoda, S, Hinata, K and Gómez-Campo, C (eds) Brassica Crops and Wild Allies. Tokyo: Japan Scientific Societies Press, pp. – : Breeding Oilseed Brassicas (Monographs on Theoretical and Applied Genetics (19)) (): Labana, Kuldeep S., Banga, Surinder S., Banga, Shashi K.

lopment of globally significant crops, the canola and Brassica allies, this book dealing with the biology, bionomics and management of insects (sensu lato, in-cluding the Acari) that live in canola and Brassica agroecosystems impresses as appropriate and timely.

This near page, multi-author vol-ume includes 25 chapters dealing with. The leaves on many brassica plants are pinnately-lobed, and often deeply so. Most brassicas also smell of hot, peppery, sulphurous compounds when crushed. Numerous brassicas are biennial, meaning they take two years to complete their life cycle.

These plants grow as a rosette in the first year, then flower during the second. Snogerup, Sven. “The Wild Forms of the Brassica oleracea Group (2n = 18) and Their Possible Relations to the Cultivated Ones.” Brassica Crops and Wild Allies. Eds.

Gomez-Campo, C. and K. Hinata and S. Tsunoda. Tokyo: Japan Scientific Society Press, Print. Theor. Appl. Genet. 58 () Book Reviews Tsunoda, H., Gomez-Campo, C.: Brassica Crops and Wild Allies. Biology and Breeding. Tokyo: Japan Scientific Societies Press PP.58 figs., 42 tabs. Hard bound This volume comprises 19 articles by 23 contributors which attempt to cover the systematics, chromosomes, breeding and conservation of Brassica crops and their wild relatives.

.Additional Physical Format: Online version: Oldham, Charles H. Brassica crops and allied cruciferous crops.

London, C. Lockwood, (OCoLC)The genus Brassica encompasses very diverse types of plants grown as vegetables, fodder, and sources of oils and condiments.

The species B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata, generally known as rapeseed, form the oilseed group [4,17].Within the B. rapa and B. napus species there are also vegetable crops used for human nutrition, such as turnip, turnip tops or turnip greens (B. rapa.